↓↓↓ Video ↓↓↓


Decolonizing African Knowledge: Autoethnograhaphy and African Epistemologies: EOA 22 September 2022

Your video will begin in 05:45

↓↓↓ Video ↓↓↓


6 Views

Speaker: Prof.Toyin Falola Topic: Decolonizing African Knowledge: Autoethnograhaphy and African Epistemologies ABOUT THE SPEAKER : Toyin Falola, Profe...

Дата загрузки:2022-10-05T16:35:09+0000

↓↓↓ Video ↓↓↓


Published
Speaker: Prof.Toyin Falola

Topic: Decolonizing African Knowledge:
Autoethnograhaphy and African Epistemologies

ABOUT THE SPEAKER
: Toyin Falola, Professor of History, University Distinguished Teaching Professor, and the Jacob
and Frances Sanger Mossiker Chair in the Humanities, the University of Texas at Austin. He
is an Honorary Professor, University of Cape Town, and Extraordinary Professor of Human
Rights, University of the Free State. He had served as the General Secretary of the Historical
Society of Nigeria, the President of the African Studies Association, Vice-President of
UNESCO Slave Route Project, and the Kluge Chair of the Countries of the South, Library of
Congress. He has received over thirty lifetime career awards and sixteen honorary doctorates.
He has written extensively on the humanities, including The Humanities in Africa: Knowledge
Production, Universities, and the Production of Knowledge, and Decolonizing African Studies:
Knowledge Production, Agency, and Voices. Toyin Falola is a celebrated author, editor,
writer, poet, academic leader, organizer, teacher, and Pan-Africanist. Many of his books have
received awards, defined various fields, and inspired the writings of various critical works.

ABOUT THE TALK
: Addressing the consequences of European slavery, colonialism, and neo-colonialism on
African history, knowledge and its institutions, Decolonizing African Knowledge applies
autoethnography to the understanding of African knowledge systems. Considering the
‘Self’ and Yoruba Being (the individual and the collective) in the context of the African
decolonial project, Falola strips away Eurocentric influences and interruptions from African
epistemology. Avoiding colonial archival sources, it grounds itself in alternative archives
created by memory, spoken words, images and photographs to look at the themes of politics,
culture, nation, ethnicity, satire, poetics, magic, myth, metaphor, sculpture, textiles, hair and
gender.
Category
free-erotic
Commenting disabled.